Thursday, March 31, 2016

Bikeshare safer than riding personal bikes

Anyone who’s ever ridden a bikeshare bike can tell you: they are hardy, aluminum tanks on two wheels. But does that translate to an inherently safer experience on the street, especially when many casual riders are likely unfamiliar with a city’s bike infrastructure? A recent study from the Mineta Transportation Institute determined that yes, bikeshare systems in major metropolitan areas have low rates of collisions, and are in fact safer than riding a personal bike. The report, “Bikesharing and Bicycle Safety,” examined at data from three active bikeshare systems: Capital Bikeshare in Washington, D.C., Nice Ride in Minneapolis/ St. Paul, and Bay Area Bike Share in the San Francisco Bay Area. Researchers also met with focus groups of bikeshare riders and non-members in San Francisco and San Jose to determine riders’ habits and perceptions, sought insight from road-safety experts, and analyzed crash data from the various operators and state transportation agencies in the three metropolitan areas. Read more here
.

Saturday, March 26, 2016

Salt Lake city street removes parking, adds bike lanes and sales go up

Protected bike lanes require space on the street, and removing curbside auto parking is one of several ways to find it. But whenever cities propose parking removal, retailers understandably worry. A growing body of evidence suggests that if bike lanes and parking removal are part of a general plan to slow traffic, everybody can win. In an in-house study of its new protected bike lane, Salt Lake City found that when parking removal was done as part of a wide-ranging investment in the streetscape — including street planters, better crosswalks, public art and colored pavement — it converted parking spaces to high-quality bike lanes and boosted business at the same time. On 300 South, a street that's also known as Broadway, SLC converted six blocks of diagonal parking to parallel parking and also shifted parallel parking away from the curb on three blocks to create nine blocks of curb-and-parking-protected bike lanes on its historic downtown business corridor.It added up to a major road diet on part of the street (from five general travel lanes to three) and much less auto parking on another part (a 30 percent cut total). Read more here.

Thursday, March 24, 2016

Bike Share System organisation in UK

Bikeplus is a new representative body for the UK’s bike share schemes. Sixteen towns and cities have bike share schemes, with at least another four in development. Over 10 million trips were made by shared bikes in the UK in 2015. Bikeplus roles can be summarised into three key functions: Collect data to provide evidence of for the benefits of bike share schemes. Collecting and sharing information on: statistics on bike shares status in UK, good practice for setting up successful schemes, developments overseas, Development of pioneering projects to ensure the social and environmental benefits are maximised and evenly spread. A selection of fact sheets and research from the European Cyclists’ Federation, the Obis Project, the University of West England, and Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (US). Contributions to this resource archive are welcome, please email info@bikeplus.org.uk European Cyclists’ Federation fact sheet. Go to their webpage.

Monday, February 8, 2016

London could soon have more cyclists than motoristen on its streets

Londoners are aking to bicycles in record numbers. The number of commuters taking to bicycle in the city have tripled since 2000, while commuting by car has been cut in half. Since the turn of the century, London has seen the number of commuters traveling by bike triple from 12,000 daily commuters to 36,000. Jason Sayer of The Architect’s Newspaper reports that despite the growth, London still lags behind other European cities, including Madrid and Oslo, which have moved to limit automobile access to their city centers. However, as ridership grows better infrastructure is being built to meet demands for safety and access. Britain now boasts over two million weekly cyclists—an all-time high, according to British Cycling, a governing body in the UK. Sales of U.K. manufactured bikes subsequently grew 69 percent in 2014 and the effect of this is most evidently seen in the capital. “You can probably trace it back to the bombing attacks in London in 2005,” points out Simon Mottram, founder of cycling clothing firm Rapha, in a BBC report. “Not to forget the government’s Cycle To Work scheme [introduced back in 1999 and which allows people to buy a bike tax-free]. Read more here.

Thursday, January 21, 2016

The transformation of Tel Aviv: how cycling got cool in Israel’s hippest city

When four Israeli cyclists suggested to the Tel Aviv city council in 1994 that it might be a clever idea to promote the bicycle as a new mode of transport, they were met with laughter. “They were told that cycling was something for third world nations,” says Yotam Avizohar, director of the Israel Bicycle Association. “The council official said: ‘Tel Aviv is a modern city. We only promote sophisticated transport solutions. Very soon we will have a light rail system.’” Undeterred, the cyclists gave it another try and approached a council official who they knew to be a cyclist himself. “This time, they were told that cycling was something for European countries. The man said: ‘Israel is a Middle-Eastern country and Israelis are addicted to their cars or to their camels.’ He didn’t see how it could ever be changed.” More than 20 years later, the realisation of the Tel Aviv light rail system is still a very long way off. But cycling has definitely become the new mode of transport in the city. Everywhere you go in Tel Aviv, you see people on bikes, and most of them aren’t wearing any special gear. In Israel’s hippest city, cycling is the hippest way to get around. Read more here.

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Tuesday, December 15, 2015

Halifax bike share system: extending the “reach” of pedestrians

This document gives insight how to approach a bike share project as a city. Some elements: Multiple operating structures exist, such as: Non-profit, Privately owned and operated, direct contract with operator, transit owned and operated, administrative non-profit with private operator. For the purposes of this pre-feasibility analysis, a non-profit operating structure was chosen due to the frequency at which it has been used for other bike share systems throughout North America. A non-profit would be formed to manage and operate the bike share system. The organization would be responsible for procuring funding, equipment, defining system guidelines, launching the system, and providing expertise for operations.There are a number of general start-up costs. Capital and installation costs associated with the creation of a bicycle share system include equipment purchases, site planning, installation and deployment costs. Annual operating costs after system launch are also included. These costs include salaries, equipment maintenance and replacement, rebalancing equipment, system software upkeep. Read on here.


Monday, December 14, 2015

The Bike-Share Planning Guide from ITDP

Bike-share has taken many forms over the course of its development, from free bikes left for a community to use at will to more technologically advanced and secure systems. In every iteration, the essence of bike-share remains simple: anyone can pick up a bike in one place and return it to another, making point-to-point, human- powered transportation feasible. Today, more than 600 cities around the globe have their own bike-share systems, and more programs are starting every year. The largest systems are in China, in cities such as Hangzhou and Shanghai. In Paris, London, and Washington, D.C., highly successful systems have helped to promote cycling as a viable and valued transport option.  Each city has made bike-share its own, adapting it to the local context, including the city’s density, topography, weather, infrastructure, and culture. Although other cities’ examples can serve as useful guides, there is no single model of bike-share. Read more here.